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20121103
20121103
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structure has been dominated by the same small groups of people. same thing in egypt. pakistan and egypt are different stories. the military in both countries controls upwards of 40% of the economy directly on the rest of that, a small group of elite. so that is what holds development back, the lack of big trees fallen in getting the new. take us back to your gm questions. and you need to have the capabilities of society to repurpose out of was released when something dies, when something old false, but there has not been enough of that in a place like pakistan or egypt. i think it gets to the point you're talking about. >> philip auerswald, what to teach at george mason? >> welcome to teach economics and social entrepreneurship. i've been in business school. i teach that a regular entrepreneurship. i'm a believer as a transformative source in society. but a transformative about thinking how to address public challenges in the notch gregorio manor, potentially envision new ventures company pathways to make the most of that. so there are a lot of folks in this book you might save oaks are
-the-board policy of either administration. >> well, you had three years. dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they are working on syria. it is pretty difficult as flip a switch and change every country within a matter of days. part of the obama philosophy, which is interesting, it is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in traps of unnecessary wars, replication of imperialism, and quagmire. so you have these two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. and here you have people on the streets, clearly in opposition to the dictator there. for example, tiananmen square, bush junior and a crackdown there. around the 50s, of course, lots of examples where we tell folks and we say if you want to crack down on us, that is the typical way it is going down. for president bush to go to hosni mubarak and say you can't stand aside, you're not going to keep this if you do it that way. because of that factor, one of the key factors are gotten pushed out, libya was a different story where he had a possibility of a massacre during an obama sai
awakening" that began nearly two years ago. bringing the rise of elected islamist governments in egypt and elsewhere -- and a raging civil war in syria. here, too, stark rhetoric masks murky differences. romney says he'd do more to arm syria's rebels but has not said the u.s. would do the arming. the obama white house has resisted doing so, for fear heavy weapons would end up with anti-american jihadists or terrorists. vali nasr is dean of the johns hopkins school of advanced international studies. >> the differences between the candidates at the moment do not appear very large because our response to the arab spring has been fairly consistent across both political parties. >> in afghanistan, likewise, the two candidates agree on withdrawing the remaining 68,000 combat troops by the end of 2014. and after 2,000 american dead there, 4,000 in iraq, and tens of thousands wounded, neither candidate, much less the american public, seems to have the stomach for another major ground war. the danger in all this, says vali nasr, is that after all this post-9/11 turmoil and war, and the killing
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3